5 comments

  1. lol, went through this this past weekend.  Friend gave us emachine, other friends wanted her old files.  Network Magic, Radio Shack and windows zip file compression saved the day.  Also http://theoatmeal.com/comics/computers was way too close to home (h/t Tim and Jeremy).  I did have to yell at the wife to stop insisting she had to drive over with a usb and leave me alone so I could make it work.  Poor Allan still doesn’t have a machine that can play portal 2 (out of 7 Intel machines).  Emachines chat support unable to tell me if there is an upgrade path, tells me to take it to Best Buy.  Radio Shack ladies are beyond clueless about their own stock.

    Email is still the killer app.  I must make Berners-Lee cry a river.

  2. Can’t believe I haven’t seen that Oatmeal. File sharing is such an enterprise use case.

    And yes, email is the killer app of internets. I wonder sometimes if all the http/s went poof, how much it would really matter, as long as the imap and pop3 (and smtp natch) flowed. We’d be over it in a week.

  3. Don’t really see the issue with emailing stuff to yourself. It’s just a different UI to an information system. The real point is not sending but sharing. Leave the object where it is and bring the user to it. That’s the change management issue here. I read some hoo-ha a few months ago about DropBox’s TOS and DB allegedly ‘owning’ your stuff (I admit I didn’t read it in great detail) and stopped using it on principle. Basically I was using it like gmail anyway. The irony…

  4. Don’t really see the issue with emailing stuff to yourself. It’s just a different UI to an information system. The real point is not sending but sharing. Leave the object where it is and bring the user to it. That’s the change management issue here. I read some hoo-ha a few months ago about DropBox’s TOS and DB allegedly ‘owning’ your stuff (I admit I didn’t read it in great detail) and stopped using it on principle. Basically I was using it like gmail anyway. The irony…

  5. Emailing a file to yourself is a good workaround, but the problem remains unsolved. Dropbox does a great job, but I expect iCloud will be the real game-changer, since it obfuscates the concept of file location.

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