Bloggers at OpenWorld

October 12th, 2007 92 Comments

I’m happy to announce that Oracle OpenWorld this year will be open to bloggers for the first time.

Oracle has extended an invitation to leaders in the blogging community, who can come experience the pageantry of an entire city block covered by a huge tent (oh and the conference). Qualified bloggers can register for OpenWorld as “Press“. Your registration will go to a wonderfully helpful person in PR (who, along with Justin, has been instrumental in getting this done, but wishes to remain anonymous) who will check out your blog to make sure you’re legit and set you up with a pass.

We’re not picking up travel costs or expenses, sorry. This will keep you impartial. If you see me, I’ll give you a pat on the back, how’s that instead? Vinnie has convinced me (in comments) that the T/E cost is more to cover hardship on investment by the blogger, through lost time and potential revenue, than a carrot for attending. Eddie’s picture doesn’t even do the tent justice, but it gives you an idea of how big a conference OpenWorld really is.

You will get access to the entire week’s events (November 11-15), but in case you’re wondering, here are a few that might be interesting.

There are so many sessions planned, plus acres of demo ground space and exhibits that I’m sure you’ll find plenty to do. Last year was a blast, something like 40,000 people attended. This year will be bigger and better.

See you there.


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92 Responses to “Bloggers at OpenWorld”

  1. Jake Says:

    You’re not disclosing this to me are you? I’m already aware of these things. Looking forward to Dennis’ post.

  2. Irregular Enterprise mobile edition Says:

    […] to its Oracle OpenWorld event. Yay – they get the value of independent analysis…or do they? Check Jake Karamuto’s blog on the topic: Oracle has extended an invitation to leaders in the blogging community, who can come […]

  3. mkrigsman Says:

    Jake, Check out this post for a great example of how a blogger can work with a software vendor:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/projectfailures/?p=436

    SAP was really helpful, open, and forthcoming in my
    requests for information, making senior folks available as needed. On the flip side, I committed to write a balanced story. It’s a fair trade, in my opinion.

    Nothing would please me more than to get inside some of the Oracle stories, so my reporting can be more accurate and insightful. I fully recognize you are pushing this inside Oracle, so please don’t infer these comments as being critical of you.

    I think Dennis Howlett’s post on ZDNet really gets at the same issue, although he expressed it in far stronger terms:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Howlett/?p=201

    W

  4. Michael Krigsman Says:

    Jake, Check out this post for a great example of how a blogger can work with a software vendor:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/projectfailures/?p=436

    SAP was really helpful, open, and forthcoming in my
    requests for information, making senior folks available as needed. On the flip side, I committed to write a balanced story. It’s a fair trade, in my opinion.

    Nothing would please me more than to get inside some of the Oracle stories, so my reporting can be more accurate and insightful. I fully recognize you are pushing this inside Oracle, so please don’t infer these comments as being critical of you.

    I think Dennis Howlett’s post on ZDNet really gets at the same issue, although he expressed it in far stronger terms:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Howlett/?p=201

    W

  5. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Vinnie, the analyst industry and the trade press advertising industry are in the business of accepting money in exchange for ink; bloggers (ostensibly) are not. That’s the difference.

  6. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Vinnie, the analyst industry and the trade press advertising industry are in the business of accepting money in exchange for ink; bloggers (ostensibly) are not. That’s the difference.

  7. mkrigsman Says:

    Justin,

    The fundamental issue relates to integrity, honesty, and disclosing conflicts of interest and payments.

    Your comment implies that bloggers are (or should be) more honest than analysts and trade reporters. Care to expand on that?

    Michael Krigsman
    ZDNet blogger (http://blogs.zdnet.com/projectfailures)

  8. Michael Krigsman Says:

    Justin,

    The fundamental issue relates to integrity, honesty, and disclosing conflicts of interest and payments.

    Your comment implies that bloggers are (or should be) more honest than analysts and trade reporters. Care to expand on that?

    Michael Krigsman
    ZDNet blogger (http://blogs.zdnet.com/projectfailures)

  9. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Michael – it’s not a question of more/less honest; it’s a question of perception. Analysts who accept money are perceived to be credible; journalists are not–regardless of whatever the reality may be. Where should bloggers fit? With the latter, IMO.

  10. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Michael – it’s not a question of more/less honest; it’s a question of perception. Analysts who accept money are perceived to be credible; journalists are not–regardless of whatever the reality may be. Where should bloggers fit? With the latter, IMO.

  11. Jake Says:

    Michael: I saw your post and am working internal channels to find someone to talk to you about ASU (as noted in comment 18), ideally at OOW, to which you are invited. I hope you’ll be able to make it.

  12. Jake Says:

    Michael: I saw your post and am working internal channels to find someone to talk to you about ASU (as noted in comment 18), ideally at OOW, to which you are invited. I hope you’ll be able to make it.

  13. vinnie mirchandani Says:

    Justin, I just declared myself an analyst again. Where’s my check?

  14. vinnie mirchandani Says:

    Justin, I just declared myself an analyst again. Where’s my check?

  15. mkrigsman Says:

    Justin: My blog is definitely analyst-oriented — I provide analysis and advice, rather than merely report events. Therefore, I’m ready to accept payment from Oracle, and promise I will disclose the client relationship to readers, ensuring intellectual honesty. Should you think I’m joking, rest assured I’m not.

  16. Michael Krigsman Says:

    Justin: My blog is definitely analyst-oriented — I provide analysis and advice, rather than merely report events. Therefore, I’m ready to accept payment from Oracle, and promise I will disclose the client relationship to readers, ensuring intellectual honesty. Should you think I’m joking, rest assured I’m not.

  17. deal architect : Oracle's Blogger Overtures Says:

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  18. Peter K Says:

    Michael/Vinnie,
    You guys are too funny. Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest.

    Justin, are you saying that the analysts who writes research pieces (say either Gartner or Forrester) with their “Magic Quadrant”, “Hype Wave” or whatever shows Oracle being in the “Leading Innovator and Implementor”, I should take with a grain of salt as they have been paid by Oracle to ensure their ranking whereas others who have been lumped into the lower quadrant did not forked out the required monies to buy the analyst’s “opinion and research”?

    That’s a good one that my CIO is going to have to reconsider paying our subscription fees to these research services for “PAID MARKETING”. Me thinks that I have to talk to my Gartner representative regarding getting my subscription fees back.

  19. Peter K Says:

    Michael/Vinnie,
    You guys are too funny. Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest.

    Justin, are you saying that the analysts who writes research pieces (say either Gartner or Forrester) with their “Magic Quadrant”, “Hype Wave” or whatever shows Oracle being in the “Leading Innovator and Implementor”, I should take with a grain of salt as they have been paid by Oracle to ensure their ranking whereas others who have been lumped into the lower quadrant did not forked out the required monies to buy the analyst’s “opinion and research”?

    That’s a good one that my CIO is going to have to reconsider paying our subscription fees to these research services for “PAID MARKETING”. Me thinks that I have to talk to my Gartner representative regarding getting my subscription fees back.

  20. Peter K Says:

    Minor correction.

    “Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest.” should be “Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest???”.

    That’s for Justin not Vinnie or Michael.

  21. Peter K Says:

    Minor correction.

    “Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest.” should be “Analysts get the whole package paid for but press do not as it would be a conflict of interest???”.

    That’s for Justin not Vinnie or Michael.

  22. Corporate Blogger Relations: SAP vs. Oracle | www.gadgetguy.de - The GadgetGuy Says:

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  23. Jake Says:

    Hey gadgetguy, your comments are borked, so I’m responding here.

    You are wrong about intentions, as far as mine are concerned, and since you reference one of my comments, I want to clarify.

    My personal intentions for inviting bloggers is to get them access to all the customers, partners, employees, executives, etc. OpenWorld is a great place to mingle and hear people’s stories, all of them, not just the case studies.

    That said, I am not in charge of the program, which you should know by reading here. The principals involved in this discussion (Vinnie, Jeff, Michael, Dennis) have been critical, but fair. They understand that change takes time and want to be involved insofar as we invited them to the event/into the discussion.

    I suggest you do the same, or at least jump into the discussion here. And fix your comments.

  24. Jake Says:

    Hey gadgetguy, your comments are borked, so I’m responding here.

    You are wrong about intentions, as far as mine are concerned, and since you reference one of my comments, I want to clarify.

    My personal intentions for inviting bloggers is to get them access to all the customers, partners, employees, executives, etc. OpenWorld is a great place to mingle and hear people’s stories, all of them, not just the case studies.

    That said, I am not in charge of the program, which you should know by reading here. The principals involved in this discussion (Vinnie, Jeff, Michael, Dennis) have been critical, but fair. They understand that change takes time and want to be involved insofar as we invited them to the event/into the discussion.

    I suggest you do the same, or at least jump into the discussion here. And fix your comments.

  25. mkrigsman Says:

    I do agree change takes time, and Oracle has taken a step in the right direction. Usually, the first step is the hardest, so we’ll see what develops in the future.

  26. Michael Krigsman Says:

    I do agree change takes time, and Oracle has taken a step in the right direction. Usually, the first step is the hardest, so we’ll see what develops in the future.

  27. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Michael/Vinnie – are you guys asking me to fix the entire multi-billion-dollar analyst industry? Sorry, that’s above my pay grade.

  28. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Michael/Vinnie – are you guys asking me to fix the entire multi-billion-dollar analyst industry? Sorry, that’s above my pay grade.

  29. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Sorry, I meant Peter/Vinnie.

  30. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Sorry, I meant Peter/Vinnie.

  31. Marian Crkon Says:

    Being one of “straight-up consultant” bloggers (as Ann Z called us) I was pleased Oracle extended its invites to us “citizen journalists”. I see it as Oracle’s attempt to encourage a broader discussion about its products and services than a small circle of professional journalists and analyst could generate.

    A waived fee is nice, paid travel expenses would be even nicer. Personally, I will still be in red for the week due to lost consulting revenues. I can’t believe we are spending so much time on this issue.

    A bigger question for me is what will attendees get from a mega conference like OOW in return for their investment of time and money? How efficient can 1,600 sessions in five days be to “Learn, Experience and Connect”?

    Oracle speakers always emphasize that conferences are where Oracle “listens to their customers”. It is hardly a two-way discussion. If blogs can provide a constructive feedback and a forum to express opinions to whatever is being presented then the Bloggers at OpenWorld “program” would be a win for everyone. How fair and independent the coverage is is up the blog readers to decide regardless whether Oracle paid for bloggers airfare or not…

  32. Marian Crkon Says:

    Being one of “straight-up consultant” bloggers (as Ann Z called us) I was pleased Oracle extended its invites to us “citizen journalists”. I see it as Oracle’s attempt to encourage a broader discussion about its products and services than a small circle of professional journalists and analyst could generate.

    A waived fee is nice, paid travel expenses would be even nicer. Personally, I will still be in red for the week due to lost consulting revenues. I can’t believe we are spending so much time on this issue.

    A bigger question for me is what will attendees get from a mega conference like OOW in return for their investment of time and money? How efficient can 1,600 sessions in five days be to “Learn, Experience and Connect”?

    Oracle speakers always emphasize that conferences are where Oracle “listens to their customers”. It is hardly a two-way discussion. If blogs can provide a constructive feedback and a forum to express opinions to whatever is being presented then the Bloggers at OpenWorld “program” would be a win for everyone. How fair and independent the coverage is is up the blog readers to decide regardless whether Oracle paid for bloggers airfare or not…

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  39. Pawel Barut Says:

    Hi Jake,

    Will be the same policy kept for OOW2008?
    /Paweł

  40. Pawel Barut Says:

    Hi Jake,

    Will be the same policy kept for OOW2008?
    /Paweł

  41. Jake Says:

    @Pawel: The details are being worked out right now, but it sounds like PR will offer the same type of program to bloggers.

  42. Jake Says:

    @Pawel: The details are being worked out right now, but it sounds like PR will offer the same type of program to bloggers.

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