Rocky Mountain, Hi

April 11th, 2008 12 Comments

Tomorrow, I’m headed to Denver for Collaborate 08. My schedule is pretty sparse, so if you want to hang out, tweet at me during the conference. Or if you prefer email, that works too.

I started to collect all the blogs about all the sessions people are holding, attending, recommending at Collaborate, but I soon gave up since there are so many.

Eddie’s OraNA collects just about everything Oracle, so I searched for “collaborate” to get an idea. That’s the most comprehensive list I can find.

In case you missed that last two times I promoted it, the AppsLab session is:

What: Oracle & Web 2.0
Where: Room 102
When: Monday, April 14, 2008 at 0915-1015
Who: Paul

I listed a few other sessions in a previous post. It’s not too late to juggle your schedule.

Thanks to Dan and Matt, Paul and I will be attending the Oracle ACE dinner on Sunday evening. Dan dubbed us the “face” and “fingers” of the ‘Lab.

I’m looking forward to seeing familiar faces from OpenWorld and putting faces to virtual friends. Ameed, we should continue our discussion of Google/the enterprise/Salesforce.com, especially now that you have ammunition from Dennis Howlett and Josh Greenbaum.

Most of you probably know that Matt is now in the Oracle fold. I’m interested to check in with him to see how his gig is going. Speaking of new jobs, Eddie announced over Twitter that he will be starting a new one in two weeks. Not to worry, he’ll still be an Oracle enthusiast.

See you in Denver.


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12 Responses to “Rocky Mountain, Hi”

  1. Floyd Says:

    See you at the ACE dinner!

  2. Floyd Says:

    See you at the ACE dinner!

  3. Jake Says:

    @Floyd: Not if I see you first.

  4. Jake Says:

    @Floyd: Not if I see you first.

  5. dahowlett Says:

    Would love to see the feedback on whatever ammunition you think Josh and I are giving you folks.

  6. Dennis Howlett Says:

    Would love to see the feedback on whatever ammunition you think Josh and I are giving you folks.

  7. Jake Says:

    @Dennis: While the finer points differ, Justin and Ameed don’t see Google pushing into the enterprise, so they share the view you and Josh espouse.

    I’ve blogged the opposite opinion, and I still hold it. I’m curious to expand the discussion with Ameed and Justin in person. I will be sure to blog or tweet you the results.

  8. Jake Says:

    @Dennis: While the finer points differ, Justin and Ameed don’t see Google pushing into the enterprise, so they share the view you and Josh espouse.

    I’ve blogged the opposite opinion, and I still hold it. I’m curious to expand the discussion with Ameed and Justin in person. I will be sure to blog or tweet you the results.

  9. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Just to get definitions straight: If the app doesn’t involve enterprise data, it’s not an enterprise app.

    We learned a lesson years back when the concept of a hosted business intelligence apps/DWs emerged (remember “ASPs”?): Enterprises simply do not want to outsource management of business-critical data.

    Can Google potentially kill MSFT’s Office business someday (OpenOffice hasn’t yet)? Sure. But that’s not “enterprise computing” IMO.

  10. Justin Kestelyn Says:

    Just to get definitions straight: If the app doesn’t involve enterprise data, it’s not an enterprise app.

    We learned a lesson years back when the concept of a hosted business intelligence apps/DWs emerged (remember “ASPs”?): Enterprises simply do not want to outsource management of business-critical data.

    Can Google potentially kill MSFT’s Office business someday (OpenOffice hasn’t yet)? Sure. But that’s not “enterprise computing” IMO.

  11. Jake Says:

    @Justin: Google and Salesforce have advanced the ASP model. By your definition, SFDC is an enterprise app for business-critical data, and it’s outsourced and managed in the cloud. Google Apps can handle enterprise data from SFDC, so even by a narrow definition, these are enterprise apps.

    I don’t think (and didn’t say) Google would kill MSFT. They’re very smart to pitch themselves as complimentary and not competitive with the Office business. MSFT recognizes the threat though, and so should all enterprise software companies.

    I concede your point that some businesses will never go into the cloud. For them, Google can go with on-premise appliances like the Mini and GSA.

  12. Jake Says:

    @Justin: Google and Salesforce have advanced the ASP model. By your definition, SFDC is an enterprise app for business-critical data, and it’s outsourced and managed in the cloud. Google Apps can handle enterprise data from SFDC, so even by a narrow definition, these are enterprise apps.

    I don’t think (and didn’t say) Google would kill MSFT. They’re very smart to pitch themselves as complimentary and not competitive with the Office business. MSFT recognizes the threat though, and so should all enterprise software companies.

    I concede your point that some businesses will never go into the cloud. For them, Google can go with on-premise appliances like the Mini and GSA.

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