New Adventures with Raspberry Pi

August 18th, 2015 4 Comments

If you read here, you’ll recall that Noel (@noelportugal) and I have been supporters of the Raspberry Pi for a long time, Noel on the build side, many, many times, me on the talking-about-how-cool-and-useful-it-is side.

And we’ve been spreading the love through internal hackdays and lots of projects.

So, yeah, we love us some Raspi.

The little guy has become our go-to choice to power all our Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

Since its launch in early 2012, the little board that could has come a long way. The latest model, the Raspberry Pi 2 B, can even run a stripped down Windows 10 build to do IoT stuff.

Given all that we do with Raspis, I’ve always meant to get one for my own tinkering. However, Noel scared me off long ago with stories about how long it took to get one functional and the risks.

For example, I remember reading a long post early on the Pi’s history about how choosing a Micro USB was critical, amperage too high burned out the board, too low and it wouldn’t run.

The information was out there, contributed by a huge and generous community. I just never had the time to invest.

Recently, I’ve been talking the good people at the Oracle Education Foundation (@ORCLcitizenship) about ways our team can continue to help them with their workshops, and one of their focus areas is the Raspberry Pi.

After all, the mission of the Raspi creators was to teach kids about computers, so yeah.

I figured it was finally time to overcome my fears and get dirty, and thanks to Noel, I found a kit that included everything I would need, this Starter Kit from Vilros.

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Vilros Raspberry Pi 2 Complete Starter Kit

Armed with this kit, I took a day and hoped that would be enough to get the little guy running. About an hour after starting, I was done.

Going from zero to functional is now ridiculously easy, thanks to these kits that include all the necessities.

So, now I have a functioning Pi running Raspbian. All I need is a project, any ideas?

Coda: Happy coincidence, as I wrote this post, I got a DM from Kellyn Pot’Vin-Gorman (@dbakevlar) asking if knew any ways for her to use her Raspberry Pi skills in an educational capacity. Yay kismet.

Get a Look at the Future Oracle Cloud User Experience at Oracle OpenWorld 2015

August 18th, 2015 Leave a Comment

Here’s the first of many OpenWorld-related posts, this one cross-posted from our colleagues and friends at VoX, the Voice of Experience for Oracle Cloud Applications. Enjoy.

Are you all set for Oracle OpenWorld 2015 (@oracleopenworld)? Even if you think you’re already booked for the event, you’ll want to squeeze in a chance to experience the future of the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) — and maybe even make a few UX buddies along the way — with these sessions, demos, and speakers. We loved OOW 2014, and couldn’t wait to get ready for this year.

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Lucas Jellema, AMIS & Oracle ACE Director (left), Anthony Lai, Oracle (center), Jake Kuramoto, Oracle (right) at OOW 2015 during our strategy day. Photo by Rob Hernandez.

Save the Date: Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience Strategy & Roadmap Day

The OAUX team is hosting a one-day interactive seminar ahead of Oracle OpenWorld 2015 to get select partners and customers ready for the main event. This session will focus on Oracle’s forward-looking investment in the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience.

You’ll get the opportunity to share feedback about the Oracle Applications Cloud UX in the real world. How is our vision lining up with what needs to happen in your market?

Speaking of our vision, we’ll start the session with the big-picture perspective on trends and emerging technologies we are watching and describe their anticipated effect on your end-user experiences. Attendees will take a deeper dive into specific focus areas of the Oracle Applications Cloud and learn about our impending investments in the user experience including HCM Cloud, CX Cloud, and ERP Cloud.

The team will also share with you the plans for Cloud user experience tools, including extensibility and user experience in the Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS4SaaS) world (get the latest here). We’ll close out the day with a “this-town-ain’t-big-enough” event that was extremely popular last year: the ACE Director Speaker Showdown.

Want to go?

When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015
Where: Oracle Conference Center, Room 202, 350 Oracle Pkwy, Redwood City, CA 94065
Who: Applications Cloud partners and customers (especially HCM, CX, or ERP Cloud), Oracle ACE Directors, and Oracle-internal Cloud thought leaders in product development, sales, or Worldwide Alliances and Channels

Register Now!

To get on our waitlist.

Active confidential disclosure agreement required.

Chloe Arnold and Mindi Cummins, Oracle, during OOW 2014 at the OAUX Cloud Exchange

Chloe Arnold and Mindi Cummins, Oracle, during OOW 2014 at the OAUX Cloud Exchange.

Save the Date: Oracle Applications User Experience Cloud Exchange

Speakers and discussions are all well and good, but what is the future of the Oracle Applications UX really like? The OAUX team is providing a daylong, demo-intensive networking event at Oracle OpenWorld 2015 to show you what the results of Oracle’s UX strategy will look like.

User experience is a key differentiator for the Oracle Applications Cloud, and Oracle is investing heavily in its future. Come see what our recently released and near-release user experiences look like, and check out our research and development user experience concepts, then let us know what you think.

These experience experiments for the modern user will delve even deeper into the OAUX team’s guiding principles of simplicity, mobility, and extensibility and come from many different product areas. This is cutting-edge stuff, folks. And, since we know you’re worn out from these long, interactive days, this event will also feature refreshments.

Want to go?

When: Monday, October 26, 2015
Where: InterContinental Hotel, San Francisco
Who: Oracle Applications Cloud Partners, Customers, Oracle ACEs and ACE Directors, Analysts, Oracle-internal Cloud thought leaders in product development, sales, or Worldwide Alliances and Channels.

Register Now!

To get on our waitlist.

Active confidential disclosure agreement required.

IFTTT Maker Channel

August 17th, 2015 Leave a Comment

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A couple months a go IFTTT added a much needed feature: A custom channel for generic urls. They called it the Maker Channel. If you noticed my previous post, I used it to power an IoT Staples Easy Button.

At a closer look this is a very powerful feature. Now you can basically make and receive web requests (webhooks) from any possible connected device to any accessible web service (API, public server, etc..) It is important to highlight that requests “may” be rate limited, so don’t start going crazy with Big Data style pushing.

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You can also trigger any of the existing Channels with the Maker Channel.  So either you can choose to trigger any of the existing Channels when you POST/GET to the Maker Channel:

curl https://maker.ifttt.com/trigger/remote_trigger/with/key/${secret_key}

if-maker-then-hue if-maker-then-lifx if-maker-then-gdrive

Or you could have IFTTT POST/GET/PUT to your server when any of the existing Channels are triggered.

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There seems to be hundred of possible combinations or “recipes.”

Do you use IFTTT? Do you find it useful? Let me know in the comments.

IFTTT Easy Button

August 15th, 2015 Leave a Comment

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The Amazon Dash button, it’s all the buzz lately. Regardless whether you think it is the greatest invention or just a passing fad, it is a nice little IoT device. There is already work underway to try and make it work with custom code.

There are a couple crowdfunding projects (flic and btn) that are attempting to create custom IoT buttons as well. But these often come with a high price tag (around $100).

This is where the up and coming ESP8266 mcu can shine. For under $3 you can have a wifi chip plus a programable micro-controller. You just need to add a cheap button (like the Staples Easy Button for around $7.) Add good ol’ IFTTT Maker Channel and you will be set to go with your custom IoT button for about $10.

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Check my hackster.io project (https://www.hackster.io/noelportugal/esp8266-ifttt-easy-button) to learn how to make your own.

What Kids Tell Us about Touch and Voice

August 14th, 2015 2 Comments

Recently, my four year-old daughter and her little bestie were fiddling with someone’s iPhone. I’m not sure which parent had sacrificed the device for our collective sanity.

Anyway, they were talking to Siri. Her bestie was putting Siri through its paces, and my daughter asked for a joke, because that’s her main question for Alexa, a.k.a. the Amazon Echo.

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Siri failed at that, and my daughter remarked something like “Our Siri knows the weather too.”

Thus began an interesting comparison of what Siri and “our Siri” i.e. the Echo can do, a pretty typical four year-old topping contest. You know, mine’s better, no mine is, and so forth.

After resolving that argument, I thought about how natural it was for them to talk to devices, something that I’ve never really liked to do, although I do find talking to Alexa more natural than talking to Google Now or Siri.

I’m reminded of a post, which I cannot find, Paul (@ppedrazzi) wrote many years ago about how easily a young child, possibly one of his daughters, picked up and used an iPhone. This was in 2008 or 2009, early days for the iPhone, and the child was probably two, maybe three, years old. Wish I could find that post.

From what I recall, Paul mused on how natural touch was as an input mechanism for humans, as displayed by how a child could easily pick up and use an iPhone. I’ve seen the same with my daughter, who has been using iOS on one device or another since she was much younger.

I’m observing that speech as equally natural to her.

Kids provide great anecdotal research for me because they’re not biased by what they already know about technology.

When I use something like gesture or voice control, I can’t help but compare it to what I know already, i.e. keyboard, mouse, which colors my impressions.

Watching kids use touch and voice input, the interactions seem very natural.

This is obvious stuff that’s been known forever, but it took how long for someone, Apple, to get touch right? Voice is in an earlier phase, advancing, but not completely natural.

One point Noel (@noelportugal) makes about about voice input is that having a wake word is awkward, i.e. “Alexa” or “OK Google,” but given privacy concerns, this is the best solution for the moment. Noel wants to customize that wake word, but that’s only incrementally better.

When commanding the Amazon Echo, it’s not very natural to say “Alexa” and pause to ensure she’s listening. My daughter tends to blurt out a full sentence without the pause, “Alexa tell us a joke” which sometimes works.

That pause creates awkward usability, at least I think it does.

Since its release, Noel has led the charge for Amazon Echo research, testing and hacking (lots of hacking) on our team, and we’ve got some pretty cool projects brewing to test our theories. I’ve been using it around my home for a while, and I’m liking it a lot, especially the regular updates Amazon pushes to enhance it, e.g. IFTTT integration, smart home controlGoogle Calendar integration, reordering items from Amazon and a lot more.

Amazon is expanding its voice investment too, providing Alexa as a service, VaaS or AVS as they call it.

I fully believe the not-so-distant future will feature touch and speech, and maybe gestures, at the glance and scan layers of interaction, with the old school keyboard and mouse for heavy duty commit interactions.

Quick review, glance, scan, commit is our strategic design philosophy. Check out Ultan (@ultan) explaining it if you need a refresher.

So, what do you think? Thank you Captain Obvious, or pump the brakes Jake?

Find the comments.

Biohacking, Here Come the Cyborgs

August 11th, 2015 1 Comment

For me, 2015 has been the year of the quantified self.

I’ve been tracking my activity using various wearables: Nike+ Fuelband, Basis Peak, Jawbone UP24, Fitbit Surge, and currently, Garmin Vivosmart. I just set up Automatic to track my driving; check out Ben’s review for details. I couldn’t attend QS15, but luckily, Thao (@thaobnguyen) and Ben went and provided a complete download.

And, naturally, I’m fascinated by biohacking because, at its core, it’s the same idea, i.e. how to improve/modify the body to do more, better, faster.

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Professor Kevin Warwick of the University of Reading

Ever since I read about RFID chip implanting in the early 00s, I’ve been curiously observing from the fringe. This post on the Verge today included a short video about biohacking that was well worth 13 and half minutes.

If you like that, check out the long-form piece, Cyborg America: inside the strange new world of basement body hackers.

This stuff is fascinating to me. People like Kevin Warwick and Steve Mann have modified themselves for the better, but I’m guessing the future of biohacking lies in healthcare and military applications, places where there’s big money to be made.

My job is to look ahead, and I love doing that. At some point during this year, Tony asked me what the future held; what were my thoughts on the next big things in technology.

I think the human body is the next frontier for technology. It’s an electrical source that could solve the modern battery woes we all have; it’s an enormous source for data collection, and you can’t forget it in a cab or on a plane. At some point, because we’ll be so dependent on it, technology will become parasitic.

And I for one, welcome the cyborg overlords.

Find the comments.

Jeremy and Noel Talk IoT at Kscope15

August 10th, 2015 Leave a Comment

By now, you know all about the Scavenger Hunt we ran a Kscope15 in partnership with our good friends at ODTUG and YCC.

Noel (@noelportugal) talked about the technical bits in a post last week, and today, ODTUG posted an interview featuring our fearless leader, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), and Noel from the conference wherein they talk about Internet of Things (IoT) and the IoT bits included in the Hunt.

If you read here, you’ll know that IoT has been a long-time passion of Noel’s, dating back to well before Internet-connected devices were commonplace and way before they had an acronym.

Thanks to ODUTG for giving us the opportunity to do something cool and fun using our nerdy passion, IoT.

Guerrilla Testing at OHUG

August 10th, 2015 Leave a Comment

The Apple Watch came out, and we had a lot of questions: What do people want to do on it? What do they expect to be able to do on it? What are they worried about? And more importantly, what are they excited about?

But we had a problem—we wanted to ask a lot of people about the Apple Watch, but nobody had it, so how could we do any research?

Our solution was to do some guerrilla testing at the OHUG conference in June, which took place in Las Vegas. We had a few Apple Watches at that time, so we figured we could let people play around with the watch, and then ask them some targeted questions. This was the first time running a study like this, so we weren’t sure how hard it would be to get people to participate by just asking them while they were at the conference.

It turned out the answer was “not very.” We should have known—people both excited and skeptical were curious about what the watch was really like.

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Friend of the ‘Lab and Oracle ACE Director Gustavo Gonzalez and Ben enjoy some Apple humor.

Eventually we had to tell the people at our recruiting desk to stop asking people if they want to participate! Some sessions went on for over 45 minutes, with conference attendees chatting about different possibilities and concerns, brainstorming use cases that would work for them or their customers.

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The activity was a great success, generating some valuable insights not only about how people would like to use a smartwatch (Apple or not), but how they want notifications to work in general. Which, of course, is an important part of how people get their work done using Oracle applications.

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Our method was pretty simple: We had them answer some quick survey questions, then we put the watch on them and let them explore and ask questions. While they were exploring, we sent them some mock notifications to see what they thought, and then finished up asking them more in depth about what they want to be able to accomplish with the watch.

At the end, they checked off items from a list of notifications that they’d like to receive on the watch. We recorded everything so we didn’t have to have someone taking notes during the interviews. It took some time to transcribe everything, but it was extremely valuable to have actual quotes bringing to life the users’ needs and concerns with notifications and how they want things to work on a smartwatch.

Most usability activities we run at conferences involve 5–10 people, whether it’s a usability test or a focus group, and usually they all have similar roles. It was valuable here to get a cross-section of people from different roles and levels of experience, talking about their needs for not only a new technology, but also some core functionality of their systems.

In retrospect, we were a little lucky. It would probably be a lot more difficult to talk to the same number of people for an appreciable amount of time just about notifications, and though we did learn a good deal about wants and needs for developing for the watch, it was also a lot broader than that.

So one takeaway is to find a way to take advantage of something people will be excited to try out—not just in learning about that specific new technology, but other areas that technology can impact.

Game Mechanics of a Scavenger Hunt

August 7th, 2015 1 Comment

android512x512This year we organized a scavenger hunt for Kscope15 in collaboration with the ODTUG board and YCC.

As we found out, scavenger hunts are a great way to get people to see your content, create buzz and have fun along the way.  We also used the scavenger hunt as a platform to try some of the latest technologies. The purpose was to have conference attendees complete tasks using Internet of Things (IoT), Twitter hashtags and pictures and compete for a prize.

Here is a short technical overview of the technologies we used.

Registration

We opted to use a Node.js back-end and a React front-end to do a clever Twitter name autocomplete. As you typed your Twitter handle, the first and last name fields were completed for you. Once you filled all your information the form submitted to a REST endpoint based on Oracle APEX. This piece was built by Mark Vilrokx (@mvilrokx) and we were all very happy with the results.

registration

Smart Badge

We researched two possible technologies: Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Beacons and Near Field Communication (NFC) stickers and settled for NFC. The reason behind choosing NFC was the natural tendency we have to touch something (NFC scanner) and get something in return (notifications + points). When we tested with BLE beacons the “check-in” experience was more transparent but not as obvious when trying to complete a task.

We added a NFC sticker to all scavenger hunt participants’ badges so they could get points by scanning their badge in our Smart Scanners.  To provision each NFC badge we build an Android app that took the tag id and associated with the user profile.

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Smart Scanner

The Smart Scanner was a great way to showcase IoT. We used the beloved Raspberry Pis to host an NFC reader. We used the awesome blink(1) USB LED light to indicate whether the scan was successful or not. We also added a Mini USB Wi-Fi dongle and a high capacity battery to assure complete freedom from wires.

Raymond Xie (@YuhuaXie) did a great job using Java 8 to read the NFC stickers and send the information to our REST server. The key part for these scanners was creating a failover system in case of internet disconnection. In such case we would still read the NFC tag and register it, then it would post it to our server as soon as connectivity was restored.

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Twitter and SMS Bots

Another key component was to create a twitter and SMS bot. Once again, Mark used Node.js to consume the Twitter stream. We looked for tweets mentioning #kscope15 and #taskhashtag. Then we posted to our REST server which made sure that points were given to the right person for the right task. Again we were pleasantly surprised by the flexibility and power of Node.js. Similarly we deployed a Twilio SMS server that listened for SMS subscriptions and sent SMS notifications.

Leaderboards

We just didn’t settled by creating a web client to keep track of points. We created a web mobile client (React), an iOS app and an Android app. This was part of our research to see how people used each platform. As a bonus we created Apple Watch and Android Wear companion apps. One of the challenges we had was to create a similar experience across platforms.

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Administration

We needed a way to manage all task and player administration. Since we used APEX  and PLSQL to create our REST interface, it was a no brainer to use APEX for our admin front-end. The added bonus was that APEX has user authentication and sessions management, so all we had to do is create admin users with different roles.

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Conclusion

Creating a scavenger hunt for tech conference is no easy task. You have to take into consideration many factors, from what are the right task for the conference attendees to having the optimal wifi connection. Having an easy registration and provisioning process are also paramount for easy uptake.

We really had fun using the latest technologies and we feel we successfully showcased what good UX can do for you across different devices and platforms. Stay tuned to see if we end up doing another similar activity. You wont want to miss it!

Royal High School Students Visit Oracle

August 6th, 2015 Leave a Comment

Last week a group of high school students from Royal High School visited Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.

Royal High School, a public school in Simi Valley, California, is launching an International Business Pathway program. This program is part of California’s Career Pathways Trust (CCPT), which was established in 2013 by the California State Legislature to better prepare students for the 21st Century workplace.

The goal of the visit was to introduce students to real life examples of what they will be studying in the year ahead, which include Business Organization and Environment, Marketing, Human Resources, Operations, and Finance.

I was honored to be invited to be on a career panel with three other Oracle colleagues and share our different careers and career paths.

L-R Chris Kite, VP Finance A&C/NSG; Jessica Moore, Sr Director Corporate Communications; Thao Nguyen, Director Research & Design; Kym Flaigg, College Recruiting Manager

While Oracle is known as a technology company, it is comprised of many different functional areas beyond engineering. The panel shared our diverse backgrounds and education, our different roles within the organization, the different cultures within Oracle, and more.

Since these are students in an international business program, we also discussed Oracle as a global business. The panelists shared our individual involvement and impact on Oracle’s international business – from working with Oracle colleagues located throughout the world to engaging with global customers, partners, and journalists.

By the end, the students heard stories of our professional and personal journeys to where we are now. The common themes were to be authentic and true to yourself, change is inevitable, and it is a lifetime of learning. All of the panelists started on one path but ultimately found new interests and directions.

The students learned there are many different opportunities in companies and many different paths to achieve career and life goals. Bring your passion to work and you’ll succeed.

On a personal note, I grew up in the same area as these students, that being the San Fernando Valley in Southern California. I moved from the San Fernando Valley to the Silicon Valley years ago, but thanks to Oracle Giving, I am able to give back to my roots and proud to participant in Oracle’s community outreach .

Usability of Text Analytics

August 5th, 2015 Leave a Comment

User experience design as a career fell largely on the era of GUI. Thus most people in my profession are visual thinkers if not by birth than by experience. When it comes to presenting information, we think visualization. Times are changing, and with that we are challenged to present information verbally. This is where text analytics meets UX. I only worked on a handful of projects that are about text, and only with a handful of text technologies, but the experience has been worth mentioning.

Text analytics, more or less meaning the same as text mining, is “devising of patterns and trends from text through means such as statistics…” (Oh, Wikipedia!)

There are many areas of text analytics – text summarization, information retrieval, sentiment analysis, named entity recognition, and on… The tools and techniques are constantly getting better, it is exciting. I get an impression that the text mining companies are intoxicated with the coolness of technologies they build, so they think of it first and think of possible industry applications later. As I am conditioned to think in an opposite direction, it was interesting for me to see how the same technique can be so useful in one case and completely irrelevant in another.

Here is my use case inventory. Take a brand manager versus a sales representative. A brand manager might like daily sentiment analysis of her brands and those of her competitor. On the other hand, the sales representatives we have interviewed are not at all into sentiment analysis. What they look for is highly tuned searches that would brief them daily on what’s happening with their top clients. They also search for industry news that they can retweet with a hope to influence the clients. A money manager might need to use text analytics to contextualize the jump in a stock price, while a marketer would rather have a predictive text mining tool to target customers for a purchasing recommendation. I often research different design topics and am interested in text analytics that would make me see at a glance what a collection of papers or articles is about. I also like to see daily summaries of trending topics in design and technology.

So the first lesson I’ve learned is how all text analytics use cases are different.

The second lesson is how the devil is in detail.

For one of my project, I wanted to have a condensed representation of press coverage for the new release of HCM applications, specifically, its user experience. For my purposes, I wanted to have it as a cloud of words. I have collected a number of press releases and reviews, and fed them through four text analytics tools I could put my hands on, namely Semantria, Open Calais, TagCrowd, and Oracle’s own Social Relationship Management (SRM) Listen and Analyze.

Here are the results.

results

For the fairness of the comparison, I have stripped the lists of its the original formatting (the products have drastically different interfaces), and limited the results to 20 items. Moreover, some packages categorize the results into “themes,” “entities,” etc. I kind of had to either pick or merge. SRM doesn’t allow me to feed corpus of text to it to analyze, so I had to create a search query about OAUX instead.

You can see that the differences are dramatic. I believe some differences are the results of subtle choices made by the product designers – frequency thresholds, parts of speech included, the choice of either 1, 2 or 3 word phrases, etc. Other differences are the results of the actual algorithms beneath – bag of words, word vectors, neural nets, skip grams, chaining, deep learning, … . At first, I was determined to figure them all out. I quickly realized that there is no way I can get through the math of it. So I decided to approach it in a chocolate tasting way. If I like the taste, I’ll make an effort to read the ingredients.

Semantria I liked the most. I liked the combination of themes and entities; I thought the length of the phrases was well balanced. I read the ingredients. Instead of plain word frequencies, Semantria uses something called “lexical chaining” to score themes. “The algorithm takes context and noun-phrase placement into account when scoring themes.” I put “lexical chaining” high on my list of likes.

OpenCalais looked totally solid, though heavy on terms and nouns, and light on themes and adjectives. This is to no surprise, as Named Entity Recognition is OpenCalais’ core competency, and there it is unsurpassed. The new “generic relations” feature in a shape of a “subject-predicate-object” is amazing.

TagCrowd’s was definitely too plain to represent what the collection is about. This is a very simple well-meaning word frequency tool, with the stop words (the and a removed) being its only “lexical analysis” feature. From TagCrowd I’ve learned that the word frequencies can take you only that far.

Finally, there is SRM. SRM uses latent semantic analysis, which is a type of vectorial technique.

And what’s your favorite?

NodeBox

August 4th, 2015 1 Comment

In my previous post I argued that the hunt is on for a better way to code, a way more suited for a designer’s need to test new interactions. I said I wanted a process less like solving a Rubik’s cube and more like throwing a pot. What does this actually mean?

“I want to grab a clump of clay and just continuously shape it with my hands until I am satisfied.”

There are two key concepts here: “continuously shape” and “with my hands.”

Code that is continuously shaped is called reactive programming. A familiar example is the spreadsheet: change a single cell and the rest of the sheet automatically updates. There is no need to write a series of instructions and then “run” them to see what happens; instead every change you make instantly affects the outcome.

“With my hands” refers to a kinesthetic or visuospatial style of thinking which leverages our ability to perceive and manipulate spatial relationships. Traditional programming languages are frustrating for visual thinkers; they rely on a phonological style which uses hands only to type and eyes only to read.

In theory, any written language can instead be represented as a collection of elements arranged and connected in space; this is the idea behind visual programming languages. Instead of typing instructions, you drag objects around and connect them together to express ideas.

Clockwise from upper left: Origami (Quartz Composer), Coral, Scratch, Form

Clockwise from upper left: Origami (Quartz Composer), Coral, Scratch, Form

The image above includes some typical examples. Block style IDEs (e.g. Scratch) let you snap together commands like Lego bricks. The others let you drag boxes around and string wires between them.

I think it’s easy to see at a glance the problem with this approach: it doesn’t scale. Stringing wires or snapping bricks gets really messy really fast. Reaching elbow deep into a rat’s nest of wires is not anything like shaping clay.

But it doesn’t have to be this bad. The problem these examples have is that, although visual, they slavishly adhere to an imperative style of coding where instructions are listed in order and even the words within each instruction must follow a specific syntax. This forces connections into arbitrary knots and loops, creating more tangles and going against the overall flow. A visual style demands a simpler, more fluid kind of logic.

Enter an old idea in computer science which has seen a recent resurgence: functional programming. In place of a sequence of instructions which focus on how to do things, functional programming languages use chains of transformations that focus on the desired result at each point. Loops are banished and each node can have only one output so everything naturally flows in the same direction. A classic example is Lisp; a more modern functional language now gaining traction is Clojure.  Don’t be scared.

So what we need is a functional reactive programming language with a responsive, fun to use visual IDE, designed specifically for artists. Extra bonus points if it includes natural scrubbing interactions for setting values ala Bret Victor.

Meet NodeBox. NodeBox is an open source, cross-platform GUI originally developed for generative artists. I first encountered it at the OpenVis conference in 2013. The video of that presentation is a great introduction; you can skip to 22:00 to see a demo of NodeBox in action which shows how quickly and easily you can shape a visualization. This is what I mean by shaping clay.

A simple Nodebox network: Recursive Pentagons

A simple Nodebox network: Recursive Pentagons

This NodeBox “network” draws a set of nested pentagons. The structure is so simple you can see how it works just by looking at it. Make a pentagon node, color it, hook it to a “nextChild” subnetwork that makes a smaller copy, repeat three more times, then combine all five pentagons into a single display.

You can double-click on any node to render it on the main screen; a white triangle in the lower right corner indicates the currently rendered node. You can then single-click any other node to adjust its parameters – in this case the original pentagon node. By scrubbing (dragging the mouse across) the radius field I can increase or decrease its size; making the top pentagon bigger will automatically make all its children bigger. In this way I can quickly scrub values to get the result I want.

A NodeBox network which can draw itself

A NodeBox network which can draw itself

Another (somewhat mind-bending) example: a NodeBox network which can draw itself. On the right is a set of nodes that opens a JSON file, analyzes the contents, and plots it as a series of rectangles and connecting lines. On the left is what happens when that JSON file happens to contain this network’s own structure (taken directly from it’s .ndbx file).

I’ve been playing with NodeBox for about six months now and have created over forty networks which let me play with and try out various visualizations and data-driven animations. I find that some things which are easy to do in other languages are hard to do in NodeBox (or just hard for me to figure out how to do). But the reverse is also true: some things that are difficult or time-consuming to do in any other language are spectacularly easy in NodeBox.

Debugging, in particular, is much less time-consuming and almost fun. I catch most bugs instantly since every change I make is instantly rendered. When something unexpected does happen I can just click on each node in turn to follow the steps of a process. When something is too big or too small or in the wrong place I can simply scrub a parameter or even just grab the offending object and drag it where it needs to go.

Scaling up to large projects is manageable, but remains problematic. If you think clearly enough you can encapsulate everything into a handful of subnetworks and sub-subnetworks. But this can only go so far. NodeBox’s functional approach eliminates “side effects;” a change made to one function cannot affect distant functions unless those two functions are physically linked. This prevents the nasty hard-to-trace bugs which plague procedural languages, but it also means there are no global variables, which in turn means that if you want a variable to effect twenty different functions you will need to create at least twenty separate links.

You can alleviate this somewhat by using Null nodes as cable ties. If two clumps of nodes have many interlinkages, you can physically separate them, lay one cable across the void to a Null node, and then distribute its output from there. After I get something working in NodeBox I usually spend some more time “tidying up,” rearranging nodes into related clumps and positioning nodes to reduce the number of crossing lines. I regard this not as a nuisance, but as a pleasant, almost meditative ritual that helps me optimize my code.

NodeBox does have one major limitation: it doesn’t do input. It was designed to produce intricate still images and animations, not to facilitate end user interactions. So there are no input fields, no buttons, no sliders, no checkboxes – no way to create a standalone interactive prototype. These things could all be done in theory, it’s just that NodeBox does not currently provide any *nodes* to do them.

This is ironic because the NodeBox IDE itself is richly interactive. It’s vector-based ZUI (zoomable user interface) is a joy to use. So as a designer I can experience wonderful interactions by scrubbing node parameters and zooming in and out, but I can’t create a similar experience for my end users.

My use of NodeBox, therefore, is limited to creating sketches and animations. This is no small thing – it allows me to play and try and then convey the essence of ideas which are inherently hard to test and demonstrate. But for now I will still have to move to other languages if I need to create stand-alone interactives.

I think the deeper value of NodeBox is that it shows what is possible. There are better ways of imagining, better ways of coding. If we hope to create ever better experiences for our users, we need to keep searching for these better ways.

Better Ways to Play and Try

July 28th, 2015 Leave a Comment

That’s the problem: our imagination. We can’t build new interactions until A) someone imagines them, and B) the idea is conveyed to other people. As a designer in the Emerging Interactions subgroup of the AppsLab, this is my job – and I’m finding that both parts of it are getting harder to do.

If designers can’t find better ways of imagining – and by imagining I mean the whole design process from blank slate to prototype – progress will slow and our customers will be unable to unleash their full potential.

So what does it mean to imagine and how can we do it better?

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Imagination starts with a daydream or an idle thought. “Those animations of colliding galaxies are cool. I wonder if we could show a corporate acquisition as colliding org charts. What would that look like?”

What separates a mere daydreamer from an actual designer is the next step: playing. To really imagine a new thing in any meaningful way you have to roll up your sleeves and actually start playing with it in detail. At first you can do this entirely in your mind – what Einstein called a “thought experiment.”  This can take weeks of staring into space while your loved ones look on with increasing concern.

Playing is best done in your mind because your mind is so fluid. You can suspend the laws of physics whenever they get in the way. You can turn structures inside out in the blink of an eye, changing the rules of the game as you go. This fluidity, this fuzziness, is the mind’s greatest strength, but also its greatest weakness.

So sooner or later you have to move from playing to trying. Trying means translating the idea into a visible, tangible form and manipulating it with the laws of physics (or at least the laws of computing) re-enabled. This is where things get interesting. What was vaguely described must now be spelled out. The inflexible properties of time and space will expose inconvenient details that your mind overlooked; dealing with even the smallest of these details can derail your entire scheme – or take it wild, new directions. Trying is a collaboration with Reality.

Until recently, trying was fairly easy to do. If the thing you were inventing was a screen layout or a process flow, you could sketch it on paper or use a drawing program to make sure all the pieces fit together. But what if the thing you are inventing is moving? What if it has hundreds of parts each sliding and changing in a precise way? How do you sketch that?

My first step in the journey to a better way was to move from drawing tools like Photoshop and OmniGraffle to animation tools like Hype and Edge – or to Keynote (which can do simple animations). Some years ago I even proposed a standard “animation spec” so that developers could get precise frame-by-frame descriptions.

The problem with these tools is that you have to place everything by hand, one element at a time. I often begin by doing just that, but when your interface is composed of hundreds of shifting, spinning, morphing shapes, this soon becomes untenable. And when even the simplest user input can alter the course and speed of everything on the screen, and when that interaction is the very thing you need to explore, hand drawn animation becomes impossible.

To try out new designs involving this kind of interaction, you need data-driven animation – which means writing code. This is a significant barrier for many designers. Design is about form, color, balance, layout, typography, movement, sound, rhythm, harmony. Coding requires an entirely different skill set: installing development environments, converting file formats, constructing database queries, parsing syntaxes, debugging code, forking githubs.

A software designer needs a partial grasp of these things in order to work with developers. But most designers are not themselves coders, and do not want to become one. I was a coder in a past life, and even enjoy coding up to a point. But code-wrangling, and in particular debugging, distracts from the design process. It breaks my concentration, disrupts my flow; I get so caught up in tracking down a bug that I forget what I was trying to design in the first place.

The next stage of my journey, then, was to find relatively easy high-level programming languages that would let me keep my eye on the ball. I did several projects using Processing (actually Processing.js), a language developed specifically for artists. I did another project using Python – with all coding done on the iPad so that I could directly experience interactions on the tablet with every iteration of the code.

These projects were successful but time-consuming and painful to create. Traditional coding is like solving a Rubik’s Cube: twist and twist and twist until order suddenly emerges from chaos. This is not the way I want to play or try. I want a more organic process, something more like throwing a pot: I want to grab a clump of clay and just continuously shape it with my hands until I am satisfied.

I am not the only one looking for better ways to code. We are in the midst of an open source renaissance, an explosion of literally thousands of new languages, libraries, and tools. In my last blog post I wrote about people creating radically new and different languages as an art form, pushing the boundaries in all directions.

In “The Future of Programming,” Eric Elliott argues for reactive programming, visual IDEs, even genetic and AI-assisted coding. In “Are Prototyping Tools Becoming Essential?,” Mark Wilcox argues that exploring ideas in the Animation Era requires a whole range of new tools. But if you are only going to follow one of these links, see Bret Victor’s “Learnable Programming.”

After months of web surfing I stumbled upon an interesting open source tool originally designed for generative artists that I’ve gotten somewhat hooked on. It combines reactive programming and a visual IDE with some of Bret Victor’s elegant scrubbing interactions.

More about that tool in my next blog post

Four Weeks with Nothing on My Wrist

July 22nd, 2015 2 Comments

After wearing the Fitbit Surge for seven weeks, I developed an ugly skin rash. So, I took a break and let my skin breathe for a while.

I’m all better now, thanks for asking.

For most of the year, I’ve been test-driving various fitness bands and super watches and journaling my impressions here as one man’s research. After all, wearables are, and have been, a thing for a while now. So, I need to know as much as possible.

First came three weeks with the Nike+ Fuelband, then four with the Basis Peak, then four and a day with the Jawbone UP24, followed by seven with the Fitbit Surge.

If you’re scoring at home, that’s 18 weeks with something on my wrist, a lot for me after 23 years, give or take, of nothing on my wrist; I’m not really a watch guy.

Here's a random picture of chairs congregating outside Building 200

Here’s a random picture of chairs congregating outside Building 200. Enjoy.

Physical bands aside, I was also tracking and quantifying myself, my fitness and general activity data and my sleep data. I’m a fan of the quantified self and better living through statistics and math. Looking at raw numbers forces introspection that can be very revealing, in good and bad ways.

If you read here, you’ll recall Thao (@thaobnguyen) and Ben both attended QS15, and Ben has an interest quantified self devices, like Automatic. So, I’m not alone on the team.

Anyway, before I put on another device, I decided to capture the pros and cons of not wearing one, at least in terms of what was missing when I had a naked wrist.

The Pros

Not having something on my wrist all the time is pro enough. I generally don’t like encumbrances, and having my wrist free again is nice.

Typing on a keyboard is another plus. I still don’t know how people with watches do it. A guy I used to work with wore a watch, and his Macbook Pro showed the scratch damage it did to the unibody aluminum.

Being free of data collection is liberating, but it cuts both ways. On the plus side, I don’t obsess about my step count. Wearing a fitness tracker has made it painfully obvious that my life is dangerously sedentary.

If it weren’t for running on a treadmill, there are many days when I wouldn’t reach the 10,000 steps magic number.

Why is this a pro? Now that I know, I can adjust accordingly, without a tracker, and I have a general idea of how much activity generates 10,000 steps.

Taking a break from testing has given me time to reflect on the four devices I’ve used without being too close to the one I’m currently testing. When I finish this research experiment, I should take a similar break to reflect.

The Cons

On the downside, I really got used to having the time on my wrist, which is something I missed when I wore the Jawbone UP24 as well.

Even though I did find myself checking the time as a nervous habit, the utility outweighed the nervous tick.

I really miss the phone and text notifications that the two super watches, the Basis Peak and Fitbit Surge provide.

On the data collection side, I find myself needing to be pushed by numbers. It’s weird, I know; I’ll recognize something that generates more activity, like walking vs. driving, but I need the extra push to do it.

I also miss my morning data review. It became routine for me to review my night’s sleep and browse through my data each morning, my own a personal, daily report.

Now that Google has Your Timeline for Maps, you can begin to see the value of aggregating data summaries; yes, it’s creepy, especially the implications of kismet or whatever the opposite of that is, but I remain in the optimistic camp that hopes to correlate and improve based on personal data sets.

Anyway, figured since I’d been sharing my wearables observations, I might as well share my lack of wearable observations.

Sometime in the next few weeks, I’ll get started on a new one. Stay tuned.

That Time I Killed My Phone

July 21st, 2015 2 Comments

I don’t particularly like protective cases for phones because they ruin the industrial design aesthetics of the device.

Here at the ‘Lab, we’ve had spirited debates about cases or not, dating back the original team and continuing to our current team.

I am not careful with phones, and the death of my Nexus 5, which I’ve only had since October 2014, was my fault. It was also very, very bad luck.

I usually run with a Bluetooth headset, the Mpow Swift, which I quite like (hey Ultan, it’s green), specifically because I had a few instances where my hand caught the headset cord and pulled my phone off the treadmill deck and onto the belt, causing the phone to fly off the back like a missile.

Yes, that happened more than once, but in my defense, I’ve seen it happen to other people too.

However, on July 8, I was running on the treadmill talking to Tony on the phone, using a wired headset. I’ve found the Mpow doesn’t have a very strong microphone, or maybe I wasn’t aiming my voice in the right direction. Whatever the reason, the Mpow hasn’t been good for talking on the phone.

While talking to Tony, possibly mid-sentence, I caught the cord and pulled the phone off the deck.

Unlike the other times, this time, the phone slipped under the treadmill belt, trapping it between the belt and housing, sliding it the length of the belt, and dragging it over the back drum.

I stopped the treadmill and looked under, but it was trapped inside the machine. After sheepishly asking for help, we were able to get the machine to spit up my mangled phone.

Interestingly, the screen is completely intact, which gives an idea of how tough it really is. The phone’s body is sadly bent in an aspect that describes its journey over that drum. Luckily, its battery hasn’t leaked.

The device didn’t die right away. While it wouldn’t boot, when I connected it to my Mac via USB, it was recognized, although it wouldn’t mount the storage like it normally would. Something about the device consuming too much power for USB.

I tried with a powered USB hub, but I think the battery gave up the ghost.

Happily for me, I had recently bought a second generation Moto X on sale, and I’d been postponing the switch.

Unhappily, every time I switch phones, I lose something, even though I keep backups. When my Nexus 4 died mysteriously, I lost all my photos. This time, I lost my SMS/MMS history.

Like I said, I’m careless with phones.

The Pen is Mightier with the User’s Experience

July 15th, 2015 Leave a Comment

If you’re involved in enterprise user experience (UX) it will come as no surprise that the humble pen and paper remains in widespread use for everyday business.

Sales reps, for example, are forever quickly scribbling down opportunity info. HR pros use them widely. Accountants? Check. At most meetings you will find both pen and paper and digital technology on the table.

That’s what UX is all about, understanding all the tools, technology, and job aids, and the rest, that the user touches along that journey to getting the task done.

Although Steve Jobs famously declared that the world didn’t need another stylus, innovation in digital styli, or digital pens (sometimes called smartpens), has never been greater.

Microsoft is innovating with the device, h/t @bubblebobble. Apple is ironically active with patents for styli, and the iPen may be close. Kickstarter boasts some great stylus ideas such as the Irish-designed Scriba (@getbscriba), featured in the Irish Times.

It is the tablet and the mobility of today’s work that has reinvigorated digital pen innovation, whether it’s the Apple iPad or Microsoft Surface.

Livescribe Echo smartpen and notebook

Livescribe Echo smartpen and notebook

I’ve used digital pens, or smartpens, such as the Livescribe Echo for my UX work. The Echo is great way to wireframe or create initial designs quickly and to communicate the ideas to others working remotely, using a pencast.

Livescribe Echo pencast viewed from the desktop

Livescribe Echo pencast viewed from the desktop

Personally, I feel there is a place for digital pens, but that the OG pen and paper still takes some beating when it comes to rapid innovation, iteration, and recall, as pondered on UX StackExchange.

An understanding of users demands that we not try to replace the pen and paper altogether but to enhance or augment their use, depending on the context. For example, using the Oracle Capture approach to transfer initial strokes and scribbles to the cloud for enhancement later.

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You can read more about this in the free Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience Innovations and Trends eBook.

Sure, for some users, a funky new digital stylus will rock their world. For others, it won’t.

And we’ll all still lose the thing.

The pen is back? It’s never been away.

Cross-posted from Ültan’s Über Üsable Apps, thanks Ultan (@ultan).

On Oracle Corporate Citizenship

July 14th, 2015 3 Comments

Yesterday, our entire organization, Oracle Applications User Experience (@usableapps) got a treat. We learned about Oracle’s corporate citizenship from Colleen Cassity, Executive Director of the Oracle Education Foundation (OEF).

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I’m familiar with Oracle’s philanthropic endeavors, but only vaguely so. I’ve used the corporate giving match, but beyond that, this was all new information.

During her presentation, we learned about several of Oracle’s efforts, which I’m happy to share here, in video form.

First, there’s the OEF Wearable Technology Workshop for Girls, which several of our team members supported.

Next Colleen talked about Oracle’s efforts to support and promote the Raspberry Pi, which is near and dear to our hearts here. We’ve done a lot of Raspi projects here. Expect that to continue.

Next up was Wecyclers, an excellent program to promote recycling in Nigeria.

And finally, we learned about Oracle’s 26-year-old, ongoing commitment to the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund.

This was an eye-opening session for me. Other than the Wearable Technology Workshop for Girls, I hadn’t heard about Oracle’s involvement in these other charitable causes, and  I’m honored that we were able to help with one.

I hope we’ll be able to assist with similar, charitable events in the future.

Anyway, food for thought and possibly new information. Enjoy.

More Kscope15 Impressions

July 8th, 2015 Leave a Comment

Kscope15 (#kscope15) was hosted at Diplomat resort along beautiful Hollywood Beach, and the Scavenger Hunt from OAUX AppsLab infused a hint of fun and excitement between the packed, busy, and serious sessions.

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The Scavenger Hunt was quite a comprehensive system for people to win points in various ways, and keep track of events, points and a leaderboard. And of course, we had one Internet of Things (IoT) component that people could search for and tap to win points.

And here is the build, with powerful battery connected to it, complete with anti-theft feature, which is double-sided duct tape :) All together, it is a stand-alone, self-contained, and definitely mobile, computer.

Isn’t it cool? I overheard on multiple occasions people say it was the coolest thing at the conference.

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One of the bartenders at the Community Night reception wanted to trade me the “best” drink of the night for my Raspberry Pi.

I leased it to him for two hours, and he gave me the drink. That fact is that I would put the Raspberry Pi on his table anyway for the community night event, and he would give me the drink anyway if I knew how to order it.

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On the serious side, APEX (Oracle Applications Express) had a good showing with many sessions. Considering our Scavenger Hunt Web Admin was built on APEX, I am interested in learning it too. After two hands-on sessions, I did feel that I’d use it for quick web app in the future.

On the database side, the most significant development is ORDS (Oracle REST Data Services) and the ability to call a web end-point from within database. This opens up possibility of monitoring data/state change at the data level, and triggering events into a web server, which in turn can trigger client reaction via WebSocket.

Again the Kscope15 was a very fruitful event for us, as we demonstrated Scavenger Hunt game and provoked lots of interest. It has some potential for large event and enterprise application, so stay tuned while we make some twist to it in the future.

Editor’s note: Raymond (@yuhuaxie) forgot to mention how much fun he had at Kscope15. Pics because it happened:

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ODTUG (@odtug) commissioned a short film, which was shot, edited and produced during the week that was Kscope15. It debuted during the Closing Session, and they have graciously shared it on YouTube. It’s 10 minutes, but very good at capturing what I like about Kscope so much.

Noel appears to talk about the Scavenger Hunt at 7:29. Watch it here.

Lots of OAUX Updates

July 7th, 2015 Leave a Comment

While I spent June wrapping up conference season at OHUG and Kscope, Ultan (@ultan), Misha (@mishavaughan) and company (@usableapps) have been busily publishing content.

This here is a wrap-up of that content, but let’s be honest. If you like OAUX content, you really should follow the official blogs of OAUX: Usable Apps in the CloudVoXuser experience assistance: cloud design & development.

Oh and follow @usableapps too. That’s done, so let’s get recapping.

Strategy Anyone?

Over on VoX, you can read all about Oracle’s Cloud Application user experience strategy in three short posts.

In the first part, read about how we apply Simplicity, Mobility, Extensibility to Cloud Applications. In part two, read about big-picture innovation and how it drives our Glance, Scan, Commit design philosophy. Finally, in the big finish, read about how we ap
ply all this to designing and building experiences for our cloud users.

As a bonus, our team, our projects and our strategic approach to emerging technologies are mentioned in each post. So, yay us.

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More Apple Watch

You’ve read our takes, and Ultan’s, on the Apple Watch, and now our GVP, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley) has shared his impressions. Good stuff in there, check it out if you’re looking for reasons to buy a smartwatch.

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Not convinced of the value? Longtime friend of the ‘Lab, David Haimes (@dhaimes) might have what you need to go from cynic to believer.

We Heart APIs

Channeling his inner Mark (@mvilrokx), Ultan has a two-minute tech tip for Bob Rhubart of OTN (@OTNArchbeat) about APIs, how valuable they are, and how good ones make all the difference.

We love us some APIs, especially the good ones. Developers are users too.

Speaking of APIs and developers, check out two videos that tie developer use cases with PaaS4SaaS.

Big Finish, ERP Cloud and Cake

And finally, let’s finish with some ERP Cloud goodness, a post on UX, ROI and cake and a post on cake starring David.

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Told you they’ve been busy.

Kscope15 Impressions

July 6th, 2015 2 Comments

As per Jake’s post, we got to spend a few days in Florida to support the Scavenger Hunt that we created for the Kscope15 conference.  Since it ran pretty smoothly, we were able to attend a few sessions and mingle with the attendees and speakers, here are my impressions of the event.

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This was my first time at Kscope.  Jake hyped it up as a not-to-miss conference for Oracle developers and despite my high expectations of the event, it did not disappoint.  The actual conference started Sunday but we arrived Saturday to setup everything for the Scavenger Hunt, dot a few i’s and cross some t’s.

We also ran a quick training session for the organizers helping with the administration of the Scavenger Hunt and later that night started with actually registering players for the hunt.  We signed up about 100 people on the first evening.  Registration continued Sunday morning and we picked up about 50 more players for a grand total of 150, not bad for our first Scavenger Hunt.

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The number of sessions was a bit overwhelming so I decided to focus on the Database Development and the Application Express track and picked a few session from those tracks.  The first one I attended was called “JSON and Oracle: A Powerful Combination” where Dan McGhan (@dmcghan) from Oracle, explained how to produce JSON from data in an Oracle Database, how to consume JSON in the Oracle Database and even how to use it in queries.

It turns out that Oracle 12.1.0.2 has some new, really cool features to work with JSON so be sure to check those out.  Interestingly, our Scavenger Hunt backend is using some of these techniques, and we got some great tips from Dan on how to improve what we were doing. So thanks for that Dan!

Next I went to “A Primer on Web Components in APEX” presented by my countryman Dimitri Gielis (@dgielis).  In this session, Dimitri demonstrated how you can easily integrate Web Components into an APEX application.  He showed an impressive demo of a camera component that took a picture right from the web application and stored it on the database.  He also demoed a component that integrated voice control into an APEX application, this allowed him to “ask” the database for a row and it would retrieve that row and show it on the screen, very cool stuff.

That night also featured the infamous “APEX Open Mic” where anybody can walk up to the mic and get five minutes to show off what they’ve built with APEX, no judging, no winners or losers, just sharing with the community, and I must say, some really impressive applications where shown, not the least of which one by Ed Jones (@edhjones) from Oracle, who managed to create a Minecraft-like game based on Oracle Social Network (OSN) data where treasure chests in the game represent OSN conversations. Opening the chest opens the conversation in OSN. Be sure to check out his video!

The next day, I attend two more sessions, one by our very own Noel Portugal (@noelportugal) and our Group Vice President, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), I am sure they will tell you all about this through this channel or another so I am leaving that one for them.

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The other session was called “An Introduction to JavaScript Apps on the Oracle Database,” presented by Dan McGhan.  Dan demonstrated how you can use Node.js to enhance your APEX application with among other things, WebSocket functionality, something not natively offered by APEX.  Here I also learned that Oracle 12c has a feature that allows you to “listen” for particular changes in the database and then broadcast these changes to interested parties (Node.js and then WebSockets in this case), this is for sure something that we are going to be using in the future in some of our demos.

The 3rd day was Hands-On day and I attend 2 more sessions , first “Intro to Oracle REST Data Services” by Kris Rice (@krisrice) from Oracle, and then “Soup-to-Nuts of Building APEX Applications” by David Peake (@orcl_dpeake) from Oracle.

In the first one we were introduced to ORDS, a feature in the Oracle DB that allows you to create REST services straight on top of the Database, no middle tier required!  I’ve seen this before in MySQL, but I did not know you could also do this in an Oracle DB. Again this is a supper powerful feature that we will be using for sure in future projects.

The second, two-hour, session was a walk through of a full fledged APEX application from start to finish by the always entertaining David Peake.  I must admit that by that time I was pretty much done, and I left the session half way through building my application. However, Raymond @yuhuaxie) managed to sit through the whole thing so maybe he can give some comments on this session.

All I can say is that APEX 5.0 was extremely easy to get started with and build a nice Web Application with.

And that was KScope15 in a nutshell for me.  It was an awesome, exhausting experience, and I hope I can be there again in 2016.

Cheers,

Mark.